The Blog on Meeting Room Management

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Design-wise, the modern office has undergone a seismic shift over the past generation.

Instead of cubicles and coveted corner offices, the modern workplace is an expanse of foosball tables, dogs, and mid-century-inspired desks stretched as far as the eye can see across wide-open spaces.

But beyond these radical design updates, the modern workplace has also evolved in a variety of other ways. From culture to technology, today we’re going to dive into how both the nature of work and how it’s being done has changed considerably in recent decades—and what you can do to keep up. 

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When it first came on the market, the standing desk was supposed to revolutionize the health and productivity of office-based employee, yet many years into the trend the jury is still out on the actual extent of these health benefits. And while standing desks are already prevalent in startups, incubators, and shared workspaces, they have taken longer to trickle down into the more traditional office setting. As more and more corporate offices are updating their equipment, technology, and design to keep up employees happy and engaged, standing desks are starting to become more and more common. So what’s the verdict on the standing desk phenomenon, and are they worth the investment?

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When you hear the words “modern office”, what do you think? Many people start talking about open concepts, ample natural lighting, and contemporary furniture. That’s all true. But today’s modern office is much more than the physical environment. Intelligent technologies are changing the way employees interact with and work within their offices. The modern office is a smart office.

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The list of reasons to hire an office manager are almost as endless as the potential roles they can fill within your company. Search through job descriptions for the position and you’ll find a dizzying array of responsibilities outlined from operations and administrative duties to budgeting and billing. That’s because an office manager’s main job is to make the day-to-day operations of your business run smoothly, whatever that may mean for your company, and because of this the role is flexible enough to fulfill just about any needs you may have.

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Everywhere you go, it seems that hot desking is the hot office spatial management technique. Corporate real estate prices are through the roof, and to add insult to injury, most expensive office spaces are under-utilized. Hot desking helps optimize those spaces and dollars by allowing multiple people to share the same workstation or desk at different times.

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Your front desk staff wears many hats for your company. It could be argued that this position is one of the most varied, perceptive, and all-encompassing in the organization. Depending on the size of your company, this person serves the role of scheduler, office manager, travel agent, conflict negotiator, and meeting manager. From stocking office supplies and making copies to greeting visitors as the face of the company, they keep the flow of the office running smoothly.

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Millennials have fully infiltrated the workforce and they’re changing it … for the better. Once seen as an entitled, overly coddled generation, employers have come to realize that in fact, this rising generation of workers and leaders is deeply committed, socially connected, and incredibly productive. Never before has a group of people been more inundated with technology throughout the entirety of their lives. As a result, they think differently and expect more. 

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Move over, Baby Boomers, the next generation of the workforce is here. And they’re demanding change.

As of 2017, Millennials—those born between 1981 and 1996—make up the largest generation in the workforce. They’re bringing with them new talents, capabilities, and work ethics. They’re also bringing a number of expectations about the type of companies they want to work for, the offices they want to spend their time, and the style of working they want to execute.

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