The Blog on Meeting Room Management

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Build versus Buy: Don't Build Your Own Meeting Management Solution

As a CIO, CTO, or an IT project manager, balancing your company's immediate needs with its long-term growth is paramount to success. But it is also one of the business's most significant challenges.

Complicated questions arise, such as whether you should invest aggressively in long-term initiatives or take a less expensive and more conservative approach. And these questions have not become easier considering the consequences of Covid-19.

A standard piece of this puzzle is the "build versus buy" question that many companies face when addressing their software needs. Does a cloud-based solution address your company's unique needs, or do you need a customized solution designed for your organization?

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Client and case confidentiality is a key tenet of any law firm. The privilege of confidentiality fosters trust between attorneys and clients. Duties related to confidentiality, such as the attorney-client-privilege, assure clients are open and honest with their representation so lawyers can provide the best advice.

The challenges of complete confidentiality abound both outside and inside of the office. Attorneys, of course, know not to discuss sensitive or privileged information regarding clients or cases in public places. However, the offices, conference rooms, hallways, and reception desks of the firm are all also hot beds for potential information leaks.

There are three key steps law firms can take to ensure total client confidentiality in every corner of the firm.

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Boston-based law firm Burns & Levinson is comprised of 125 attorneys who focus on a number of core practices and specialties. The firm was founded in 1960 on the principle of being accessible and responsive to clients. This client-centric commitment to service means attorneys serve as advisors, legal counsel, and business strategists and are available to offer personal attention from senior partners on down.

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The meeting challenge: We say it so often it, it should be one of our taglines: without a meeting management solution, a one-hour meeting is never just a one-hour meeting. Meetings are a constant source of wasted resources and frustrated office workers. In fact, according to recent research, meetings are considered the No. 1 time-waster at the office

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The following post is a guest post from GetVoIP

Running efficient meetings is an essential part of running an efficient business.

In the modern workplace, with workplace flexibility and remote workers, scheduling and executing meetings has become more complex. However, it's still possible to conduct meetings effectively by following best practices such as:

  • Using a detailed agenda

  • Provide necessary preparation materials ahead of the meeting

  • Designate a meeting facilitator to provide structure

  • Focus on task completion rather than timeframes

  • Implement some sort of follow-up mechanism to review meeting takeaways

GetVoIP has put together an infographic that shares these tips, plus specific meeting strategies from some of the most successful leaders from around the world.

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These days, every smart business has their eye to the future. Not just for goal-setting, benchmarking, and bottom-line growth, but for cultivating the type of office environment that serves as a lasting space for attracting top talent and allowing workers to flourish. 

We’ve gone in depth with our own 10 steps to creating tomorrow’s future workplace today, which you can read about in one of our recent blog posts. With the right amount of planning that focuses around an understanding and appreciation of the way your employees work best, you don’t have to invest millions into creating the type of future workplace that rivals that of Google or Facebook. The future, after all, is all about people. 

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The modern workplace of today bears little resemblance to the modern workplace of 50 years ago. Just think about the mid-day booze-swilling, male-dominated, Mad Man-era office setting compared to today’s increasingly diverse, kombucha-sipping, dog-friendly open spaces. Some changes have evolved slowly like workplace diversity and others have cropped up seemingly overnight like gourmet coffee bars and company kick ball leagues. 

We’ve written a lot about the environment of today’s modern workplace, but as you strive to keep your company attractive and competitive today, it’s critical to plan for what’s going to make it shine in the future. The last thing you want to do is invest in a full-scale office remodel, only to find what you consider modern today is outdated thinking five years from now. Making those predictions may seem like an exercise in futility which office worker in the 1970s would dream that ping-pong tables would replace conference room tables and cubicles would relegated to the depths of office hell? That’s why we’ve put together a guide for planning for the office of the future. 

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Planning the perfect meeting is so much more than putting together a compelling PowerPoint presentation. Much of a meeting’s success has to do with not only the flow of the presentation itself, but also the care you put into creating a welcoming environment conducive to productivity for all of those involved. A professional mentor once told me that he never schedules meetings that would last longer than it takes a butt to fall asleep in a seat. I love that philosophy, but in today’s meeting-filled business world, it can often be unrealistic.  

The best way, then, to keep the room’s attention high is to provide ample comfort options, besides the comfort level of the chairs themselves, of course. When it comes to keeping productivity high in lengthy meetings, there are two magic words you need to remember: “food” and “coffee.”  

5 common Front Desk Problems

How often do you find yourself in front of another guest log book in a fancy office building lobby, hurriedly scribbling your name at the end of the a long list of names and times before you? Then you hand over your ID, have your photo taken, and wait as your visitor pass is printed out.

But wait, your host must have forgotten to add you to the day’s front desk visitor list because they can’t find you on the approved list. So you stand and wait while front desk security calls up to your host company.

Your meeting host is away from his desk, so you just have to sit tight until they can be tracked down. As the minutes tick by, you worry about the time cutting in to your meeting. If the meeting goes over, you’ll have to push back all of your afternoon appointments.

[Infographic] A one hour meeting is never just a one hour meeting

The Curse of the One-Hour Meeting.

There’s no shortage of jokes about the futility of the average business meeting. Comic strips lament it. Television shows highlight its honor in the hierarchy of company doldrums. It’s possible there is a level of Dante’s Inferno devoted solely to business meetings. 

Almost everyone in today’s business world has experienced the frustration of meetings on scheduling more meetings, the one-hour meeting that stretches well into the afternoon, and most agonizingly, the crush of work that follows the valuable time spent planning for, scheduling, and organizing meetings. 

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