The Blog on Meeting Room Management

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By now, we all know what constitutes acceptable office behavior. We try to be courteous of the people we spend so much time with five days a week. No one wants to be known as the guy who microwaves fish every day in the office kitchen or the woman who never cleans up after herself in shared spaces. But what about being known as the guy who always camps out in pre-booked conference rooms? Or the woman who can never get the A/V to work during meetings?

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Operations managers know—one of the biggest expenses associated with keeping a business running is the cost of office space. 

And with the increasing mobility and flexibility of the workforce as well as rising rent prices, it’s getting harder yet more important than ever to understand and drive down the cost of utilization. 

So without further ado, let’s delve right into the true cost of poor office space utilization as well as the key metrics to track to boost utilization and improve the ROI of office space. 

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Consider a slow but consistent faucet leak. You may barely notice the individual drips, but before you realize, you’re up to your ankles in water. Bad meeting culture proliferates a company much in the same way. Examined in individual pieces, bad habits around company meetings may not seem like that big of a deal. However, often, those bad habits create a snowball of more bad habits that, when added together, result in an entirely toxic meeting culture.  

Is your company a breeding ground for bad meeting culture? Often, you might not even know it or know what to do about it. The result within the office is a lack of productivity, frustrated employees, and wasted resources. 

Know the signs of a bad meeting culture and the steps you can take to eliminate them. 

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